How To Peel Chestnuts

Image by sxc.hu/photo/160309

Image by sxc.hu/photo/160309

My family loves chestnuts, so naturally I want to find an effective way to peel chestnuts. There are many methods about peeling chestnuts on the Internet, some even come with video instructions and stuff. The most unbelievable one is to simply put the chestnuts under direct sunlight, and they will crack themselves up!

Anyway, most of the chestnut peeling methods are similar. You are suggested to cut a X on the chestnuts, put them on a chestnut roasting pan or baking pan and roast them in an oven. Some suggest that before you roast it, you can boil it for a while, so you can get the pellicle comes off more easily. Well, I tried many different methods, most of them don’t fully work at 100%. Most of the time, it’s always easy to remove the chestnut shell, but not the papery pellicle, the pellicle always got stuck with the flesh of the nut, maybe the chestnuts that I bought aren’t fresh enough or something.

Recently, I tried using a microwave to do the job, and the result is quite good. Each batch of chestnuts is different, it varies somewhat based on the variety, how fresh they are, dryness, and so on. So usually I pick up a few for testing and see how things go. As usual, I cut a X on the chestnuts, put them in a bowl, pour in a few tablespoons of water, cook in microwave for one minute. Then I pour out the water, put it back into the microwave for another minute. Now I can actually remove the shell and skin pretty easily.

Here is some nutritional information about chestnuts: Fresh chestnut fruits have about 180 calories per 100 g of edible parts, which is much lower than other nuts and dried fruit. Chestnuts contain very little fat, and no gluten or cholesterol. They are the only nuts that contain vitamin C, with about 40 mg per 100 g, which is about 65 percent of the U.S. recommended daily intake.

Tools you might find helpful for preparing chestnuts:

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